KenGilmore

Christadelphian
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KenGilmore last won the day on March 12

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About KenGilmore

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    Addicted to BEREA
  • Birthday 09/29/1967

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    Male
  • Location
    Brisbane, Queensland
  • Interests
    Evolutionary biology, ANE mythology, evolutionary theodicies and the problem of evil, cats, electronics, quantum cosmology and Doctor Who.

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  1. IIRC, David DeSilva's "Honor, Patronage, Kinship & Purity" touches on household codes in some detail. Definitely worth consulting both for his discussion of its relevance to the NT, and for the sources to which he refers.
  2. Not the best example to give: Honestly, that sort of approach is verging on the irresponsible. He's simply setting those children up for a crisis of faith when they run across such examples.
  3. Consider yourself the regional antidote to such thinking.
  4. I'll take a quiet life. A handshake of carbon monoxide. No alarms and no surprises.Silent
  5. He deserves the benefit of the doubt. I will certainly be getting it irrespective of the reviews just on his previous form alone.
  6. No Logos version. This looks like a worthy project for Logos conversion. (Kindle version winging its way to my trusty MacBook Pro as I write.) Like this post if you want me to convert it to a docx file. A non-evolution project will help keep me sane.
  7. Anywhere but the obvious - we have evidence of snake evolution from four-legged lizard-like creatures.
  8. HT: BiblePlaces Blog
  9. I'm happy to accept that there is a relationship, and furthermore, such a relationship doesn't bother me. Good advice is good advice, irrespective of its source. It's a problem only for those committed to a naive, dictation theory of inspiration.
  10. Via Luke Chandler comes the news that an inscription on a storage jar from the late 11th / early 10th century BCE site Khirbet Qeiyafa has been published: The “Išbaʿal” (Eshbaal) inscription from Khirbet Qeiyafa, discovered in 2012. (Photo by Tal Rogovski) The scholarly article can be found here.
  11. Massimo Pigliucci, a biologist and atheist who is currently Professor of Philosophy at CUNY-City College has long expressed his disagreement with movement atheism. In his May 11 2015 column "Reflections on the skeptic and atheist movements", he writes how he has been progressively disengaging from the community, due to changing professional interests. Six years ago he moved from biology to philosophy, and as Pigliucci notes, the sceptic and atheist community "has become a somewhat inhospitable environment for philosophical dialogue", something which has helped to accelerate his move from the community. His current post was catalysed by a recent e-mail exchange between Noam Chomsky and Sam Harris. Pigliucci notes: Pigliucci's list of culprits includes the usual suspects such as Dawkins, deGrasse Tyson, Hitchens, as well as Harris. He also refers to PZ Myers "who has risen to fame because of a blog where the level of nastiness (both by the host and by his readers) is rarely matched anywhere else on the Internet". Anyone who has followed that blog will be aware that this is a reasonably accurate description of an environment where the right to offend has been confused with being gratuitously offensive. Any group that is defined by what it does not believe will always have difficulty in maintaining unity without a positive cause to unite it, which is why secular humanism is likely to outlast movement atheism. Therefore, the schism and fragmenting of the atheist community is hardly surprising. Being a member of that community when as Pigliucci remarks it is permeated with celebrity culture and groupthink is hardly pleasant or productive, and given that atheism is no longer a fringe viewpoint as Pigliucci observes, is in fact undesirable and counter-productive when his goal is to move: While our presuppositions are completely different, there are some areas of common ground such as the desire not just for a better world in the future, but for one now, even though given our size and influence our ability to do this at more than a small-scale local level will be negligible. However, in terms of being better believers, part of that is to maintain the life of the mind, and to paraphrase Pigliucci, I would rather have a productive conversation with an intelligent atheist than a frustrating one with an obtuse theist. Pigliucci, even if by proxy, is definitely the sort of person with which one can have a productive conversation.
  12. You can find the rest of Juan Manuel Tebes' article which provides an overview of how archaeological views on David, Solomon, High Chronology and Low Chromnology at the ASOR Blog here.
  13. Converting grid map coordinates in archaeology books to Google Earth coordinates is a problem that I suspect few have encountered, but I suspect when it does strike, it would cause no end of frustration. Here's a solution from A.D. Riddle at the always excellent BiblePlaces Blog: Full article is here.
  14. Salutary warning from Aramaic translator Steve Caruso on how to destroy your credibility with one errant image. From his blog: So let’s take a moment to pick this apart and make some sense of it. I could be wrong, but the Netzari website appears to be a Messianic sect in the Sacred Name Movement persuasion that has produced a “new edition” from (apparently) extant translations of Aramaic texts where the names have been changed to (rather poor) transliterations of late Classical Eastern Syriac terms because they — among others — are “Ancient Galilean Aramaic renderings.” Despite… serious methodological problems, I can at least navigate around all of that and make sense of it… but there is one glaring problem that I don’t get: Why is there Brahmi text about Buddhism on the cover of an Aramaic book about Messianic Christianity? Yes, that wonderful carved text is in Brahmi script from one of the Edicts of Ashoka at Sarnath — official declarations issued in the 3rd century BCE in effort to spread Buddhism. Full article here